New Exhibit in the W. Bruce Fye History of Medicine Library: IMPRESSIONS OF MEDICINE IN AMERICA: 1680-1820

January 15, 2018 at 11:40 am Leave a comment

In a famous recollection of the France he had known on the eve of the revolution, Talleyrand said: “those who were not living in and about the year 1789 know not the pleasure of life”. In the same year, on the other side of the Atlantic, George Washington assumed office as the first President of the United States. For the future of the world that was an historic moment. It was a climax to over a decade of turmoil since 1776 – but for America, the best was surely yet to be.

This exhibit focuses on the theme of medical history from the years 1680 to 1820. These dates have been chosen because they represent the period from Thomas Thacher, (1620-1678) who wrote the earliest medical document to be printed in the American colonies, to the death of Samuel Bard, (1742-1821) who helped further medical education in America.

Benjamin Rush at the Bedside

The courage of Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) was taxed to exhaustion in the 1792 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia. When most people fled Dr. Rush stayed to care for patients.

Visitors can see this exhibit in the W. Bruce Fye History of Medicine Library on the 15th floor of the Plummer Building. 

Viewing times are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. till 1 p.m.

Exhibit Curated by Hilary J. Lane

Instructor in History of Medicine

Coordinator, W. Bruce Fye History of Medicine Library

Plummer 15-07

 

 

Entry filed under: History of Medicine.

Mayo Clinic Librarians Present at MLA 2017 Dr. Donald C. Balfour Sr. papers are now archived in the The W. Bruce Fye Center for the History of Medicine

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